• Introduction:

    Mumps is a contagious disease caused by a virus that spreads easily through coughing and sneezing. Mumps can begin with general symptoms of fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, and loss of appetite, then may progress to include swelling of the salivary glands (often referred to as parotitis when the parotid gland, located in front and below the ear, swells). There is no cure for mumps and it can cause serious health problems. The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is the best way to help protect against mumps. CDC recommends children get two doses of MMR vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. Contact your healthcare provider for vaccination availability or schedule and appointment at the Public Health Immunization Clinic by calling (937) 225-4550.

Mumps

Mumps is a contagious disease caused by a virus that spreads easily through coughing and sneezing. Mumps can begin with general symptoms of fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, and loss of appetite, then may progress to include swelling of the salivary glands (often referred to as parotitis when the parotid gland, located in front and below the ear, swells). There is no cure for mumps and it can cause serious health problems. The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is the best way to help protect against mumps. CDC recommends children get two doses of MMR vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. Contact your healthcare provider for vaccination availability or schedule and appointment at the Public Health Immunization Clinic by calling (937) 225-4550.

Mumps

What is Mumps?

  • A viral disease that can occur in people of all ages.
  • It causes swelling of the glands in front of the ears and above the jaw.  These glands are called “parotid” glands. 

What are the symptoms of Mumps?

  • Some people have no symptoms.  But in most people, early symptoms include fever, feeling tired and achy, headache and poor appetite.
  • About 2 days after the early symptoms start, one or both parotid glands become swollen.
  • Most people get better in about 2 weeks.
  • In rare cases, swelling of the testicles or ovaries, inflammation of the brain, and deafness can occur.

How is Mumps spread?

  • Contact with large droplets when a child talks, coughs, or sneezes.
  • Sharing items that have infectious saliva on them, such as water bottles or cups.
  • After catching mumps, symptoms can start anytime from 12-25 days later.
  • An infected person can spread mumps from a couple days before their salivary glands swell up to 5 days after swelling begins. 

How do you control the spread of Mumps?

  • Careful and frequent hand washing
  • Cover noses and mouths when sneezing or coughing with a disposable tissue, or a sleeve or elbow if tissues are not available.
  • Clean hands before and after any activity involving food or touching the mouth, nose, and eyes.
  • Prevent children from sharing cups, water bottles, and utensils.
  • Clean and disinfect toys, tables, doorknobs, and faucets frequently.

What happens during an outbreak?

  • The local health department will investigate.  Those who are infected with mumps will be instructed to isolate (stay at home) until a full five days after swelling of the parotid glands began.
  • All individuals should make sure they are up to date on their MMR vaccines.
  • Close contacts should follow instructions from the health department. 
  • In some cases, individuals identified as close contacts who are up to date with the MMR vaccine may be instructed by the health department to get another vaccine dose.  This may lower the risk of getting mumps during an outbreak.
  • Anyone who develops mumps symptoms should isolate themselves from others and contact their doctor.  Call ahead and let the doctor’s office know mumps is suspected, so care can be taken to arrange testing without risking more people becoming sick.