Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County has recently identified its first case of Monkeypox.

Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County is in contact with the Ohio Department of Health and the patient’s healthcare provider.  Close contacts will be notified by Public Health and monitored for symptoms.  Some close contacts may be eligible for vaccination to help prevent Monkeypox or decrease symptoms.

Monkeypox is a viral illness that typically begins with flu-like symptoms and swelling of the lymph nodes and progresses to a rash.  Cases recently identified across the country appear less likely to have the initial symptoms of flu-like illness or lymph node swelling and the rash, which may look like pimples or blisters, may also stay contained to a particular part of the body.  

Monkeypox spreads in different ways. The virus can spread from person-to-person through direct contact with the infectious rash, scabs, or body fluids. It also can be spread by respiratory secretions during prolonged, face-to-face contact, or during intimate physical contact, such as kissing, cuddling, or sex. In addition, pregnant people can spread the virus to their fetus through the placenta.

Touching items (such as clothing or linens) that previously touched the infectious rash or body fluids is another way monkeypox spreads. It’s also possible for people to get monkeypox from infected animals, either by being scratched or bitten by the animal or by eating meat or using products from an infected animal.

People who do not have monkeypox symptoms cannot spread the virus to others and the risk to the public is low at this time.

Monkeypox can spread from the time symptoms start until the rash has fully healed and a fresh layer of skin has formed. The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks.

The illness typically resolves itself in 2 to 4 weeks and in some cases a medication may be available to treat those who have contracted Monkeypox.

For more information about Monkeypox visit the CDC’s website.

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