• Locations & Hours:
    Reibold Building
    117 S Main Street Dayton, Ohio 45422
    Office Hours
    • Monday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
    • Tuesday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
    • Wednesday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
    • Thursday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
    • Friday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Contact - Phone Number : 937-225-5553
  • Introduction:

    Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County partners with the Ohio Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (OHHLPPP) to provide public education, public health lead investigations, and case management to lead poisoned children in Montgomery County.

  • Contact - Email: /contact
  • Customer Service :

Lead Poisoning Prevention

Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County partners with the Ohio Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (OHHLPPP) to provide public education, public health lead investigations, and case management to lead poisoned children in Montgomery County.

Caution Lead Hazard
Reibold Building
117 S Main Street Dayton, Ohio 45422
Office Hours
  • Monday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Tuesday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Wednesday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Thursday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Friday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm

Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County partners with the Ohio Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (OHHLPPP) to provide public education, public health lead investigations, and case management to lead poisoned children in Montgomery County. The program specifically addresses the needs of lead-poisoned children from birth through 72 months of age. OHHLPPP receives all blood lead laboratory reports on Ohio resident children and refers cases of lead poisoned children in Montgomery County to Public Health for lead hazard investigation and case management. The program assists family members, medical care providers and other community members to reduce and prevent lead poisoning.

Did You Know?

Lead-based paint that is in good condition does not pose a hazard. But when this paint breaks down, the lead forms a fine dust that can spread throughout the interior and exterior of a home. Children can become lead poisoned by getting this dust on their hands or toys and then putting their hands in their mouths.

Lead that is ingested is particularly harmful to the developing brain and nervous system of unborn and young children and can cause irreversible effects including learning disabilities, mental retardation, coma, and, in extreme cases, death.

If your home was built before 1978, it is likely to be painted with lead-based paint. If you have children six years old or younger, they could be at risk for lead poisoning. But don’t worry – lead poisoning is completely preventable.

Steps For Removing Lead

  • To permanently remove lead hazards, you must hire a certified Lead Abatement contractor. Abatement (or permanent hazard elimination) methods include removing, sealing, or enclosing lead-based paint with special materials.
  • Always hire a person with special training for correcting lead problems — someone who knows how to do this work safely and has the proper equipment to clean up thoroughly. Certified contractors will employ qualified workers and follow strict safety rules set by the state and federal government.
  • Contact the National Lead Information Center (NLIC) for help with locating certified contractors in your area. You might also be eligible for financial assistance.

Click Here for more information on the Lead Abatement Tax Credit Program

On July 1, 2023, ODH decreased the blood lead reference value (BLRV) to 3.5 µg/dL from the previous value of 5 µg/dL This lower BLRV will identify more children for additional lead education, medical monitoring, and environmental assessments, and highlights a need for enhanced community partnerships to decrease risks associated with continued lead exposures.At Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County (Public Health) we want healthcare providers to be aware of ODH screening requirements and medical follow-up for blood lead levels (BLLs) at or above 3.5 µg/dL and we want to share with you the actions of Public Health to evaluate these reported BLLs.

Background:

  • There is no safe blood lead level in children - even low levels of lead in blood can cause developmental delays, difficulty learning, behavioral issues, and neurological damage, effects which are believed to be irreversible. According to the World Health Organization, lead exposure in children also causes anemia, hypertension, kidney disease, immunotoxicity and toxicity to reproductive organs.
  • While there are multiple potential sources of lead exposures, deteriorating lead-based paint and resulting lead dust are the most common causes of lead exposure in children in Ohio. In Ohio, more than 2/3 of all housing units were built before 1978 and are likely to contain some lead-based paint.

Public Health evaluation of BLLs:

  1. All lead levels performed on children under the age of 16 years old are required to be reported to ODH by the clinical laboratory performing the analysis. These results are then placed in the Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning and Surveillance System (HHLPSS). Results for children under the age of 6 years old are forwarded to the local health department where the child resides. When notified, actions by Public Health will be determined based upon the venous BLL.
  2. The Ohio Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (OHHLPPP) is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for childhood lead poisoning prevention efforts in Ohio. It addresses the needs of lead-poisoned children from birth through 6 years, recognizing that health effects of exposure are most harmful to young children whose bodies are still growing and developing rapidly.
  3. For venous blood lead levels which are 3.5 µg/dL to < 10.0 µg/dL , Public Health will interview families, complete a comprehensive lead risk questionnaire, and provide education on minimizing lead exposures.
  4. For lead levels which are 10 µg/dL or higher, PHDMC will conduct family interviews, complete the lead risk questionnaire, and provide education for families on risk minimization for lead poisoned children and pregnant moms of lead poisoned children. In addition, Public Health will conduct an on-site environmental investigation and if necessary, do lead risk assessments of residential units, childcare facilities, or schools to evaluate possible sources of lead poisoning. If lead hazards are identified, Public Health will issue and enforce lead hazard control orders to the property owner.

Actions for healthcare providers:

  1. Early counselling of families, even prenatally, about sources of lead and steps families can take to prevent children from being exposed.
  2. Screening children to identify children with blood lead levels (BLLs) at or above the reference value of 3.5 µg/dL. Ohio law requires all healthcare providers to administer blood lead tests to children at age 1 and 2, or up to age 6 if no previous test has been completed and risk factors are present. These risk factors are listed on the attached PDF document “Blood Lead Testing Requirements for Ohio Children less than 6 Years of Age” (*please note, the BLL on the Blood Lead Testing Requirement document should now read ≥3.5 µg/dL instead of 5 µg/dL).
  3. Appropriate medical follow-up for children with BLLs at or above 3.5 µg/dL. The updated attached PDF document “Medical Management Recommendations for Ohio Children Receiving Blood Lead Tests” has the most recent information about the urgency for you as the healthcare provider to order confirmatory venous testing, medical management recommendations for various BLLs, and the timing of retesting after recommended actions.