• Locations & Hours:
    Reibold Building
    117 S Main Street Dayton, Ohio 45422
    Office Hours
    • Monday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
    • Tuesday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
    • Wednesday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
    • Thursday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
    • Friday8:00am - 11:30am
      12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Contact - Phone Number : 937-225-4428
  • Introduction:

    The Private Water System Program ensures that private wells are designed and installed under permit and in accordance with state and local regulations.

    A permit is required when a new water system is installed or when an existing system is upgraded, altered or abandoned and sealed. Minor repairs to existing systems do not require a permit. However, older systems with substandard construction (pit construction, buried wellheads, etc.) are required to be upgraded when repair work is performed, and that upgrade does require a permit.

  • Contact - Email: /contact

Private Water System Program

The Private Water System Program ensures that private wells are designed and installed under permit and in accordance with state and local regulations.

A permit is required when a new water system is installed or when an existing system is upgraded, altered or abandoned and sealed. Minor repairs to existing systems do not require a permit. However, older systems with substandard construction (pit construction, buried wellheads, etc.) are required to be upgraded when repair work is performed, and that upgrade does require a permit.

Water Pressure Valve
Reibold Building
117 S Main Street Dayton, Ohio 45422
Office Hours
  • Monday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Tuesday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Wednesday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Thursday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm
  • Friday8:00am - 11:30am
    12:30pm - 4:00pm

Public Health’s Office of Environmental Health provides a convenient online payment option for license and permit payments. The options available are Credit Card, Personal Check (Homeowner submittal)or Business Check.

Electronic Payments

Frequently Asked Questions

Have your water tested whenever you notice a change in odor, taste or appearance, and also annually for routine quality monitoring.

There are local private laboratories as well as mail order laboratories certified to perform various tests.

While there are many things water can be tested for, it is impractical to test for everything. For routine monitoring, a bacteria test and nitrate test are recommended. If contamination is suspected, additional tests may be selected depending on the suspected contaminant.

If the test is negative, it means there are no coliform bacteria present, and the water supply should be free from disease-causing germs that might be in surface water. If the result is positive, it means coliform bacteria are present and the water supply may allow surface water germs to enter. Further investigation is necessary to determine if cleaning or some repair is needed.

The standard for drinking water is no more than 10 mg/l of nitrate nitrogen. If the result is 10mg/l or higher, newborn infants, pregnant women and nursing mothers should stop consuming the water. Water treatment equipment for nitrate removal should be considered.

A permit is required when a new water system is installed or when an existing system is upgraded, altered or abandoned and sealed. Minor repairs to existing systems do not require a permit. However, older systems with substandard construction (pit construction, buried wellheads, etc.) are required to be upgraded when repair work is performed, and that upgrade does require a permit.

Usually, the water system contractor will obtain the permit. Homeowners or builders may also apply for permits by coming to the Public Health main office at 117 South Main Street, Dayton.

That depends. If it is constructed up to current standards, and connected to a sampling tap, it may be kept for irrigation (although some water departments require a back-flow prevention device to separate it from the public water supply). If the well is substandard, it must be either upgraded or properly abandoned and sealed.

  • Ohio Department of Health - Shares information on statewide use and performance of household sewage systems; evaluation of new sewage treatment devices.
  • Ohio Environmental Protection Agency - Collaboration to administer the NPDES General Permit for household sewage systems that discharge to waters of the State.